News

15 December, 2017

Adjaye Associates and Lighstone announce 130 William, a luxury condominium building located in downtown Manhattan. As the first large-scale, high-rise tower the firm has designed in New York City, 130 William will feature 244 residences and rise 66 stories to make a bold architectural statement and unique addition to Manhattan’s iconic skyline. The design celebrates its context in Lower Manhattan, with a hand-cast concrete façade inspired by the masonry craftsmanship of the historic buildings in the neighborhood. 130 William’s defining silhouette of rhythmic, large scale arches, which draw from the mercantile structures that once populated the area, ensure natural light floods the residences. The building also features a generous new public plaza park, providing a transition between the bustle of urban life and the respite of the residences.

“The design for 130 William acknowledges the tower’s location on one of the city’s earliest streets. Understanding that rich history, I was inspired to craft a building that turns away from the commercial feel of glass and that instead celebrates New York’s heritage of masonry architecture with a distinctive presence in Manhattan’s skyline,” said Adjaye. 

Inside the building, spacious Penthouse loggias with double height ceilings blur indoor and outdoor life while providing sweeping views, river to river, across the city. The building will offer studios to five-bedroom homes, along with a curated collection of lifestyle and wellness amenities. 130 William will include a health club with full spa, swimming pool, cold and hot plunge pools, sauna and massage rooms, as well as a state-of-the-art fitness center with a yoga studio and basketball court. The building will also feature a private IMAX movie theater, golf simulator, resident lounge, club and game room, a chef’s catering kitchen with a private dining area, children’s play rooms, pet spa, outdoor terraces, and a private rooftop observatory deck located at the top of the building, nearly 800 feet in the air.

www.architecturaldigest.com

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